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Heat and Sweating

Posted by tsco 
Heat and Sweating
June 08, 2018 12:38PM
Out of curiosity whats opinions on exertion out in the hot sun? Is it good for us that have the afib beast to exert and sweat. I understand overdoing for anyone is dangerous but are we at a greater risk by loosing minerals thru our sweat? Is heavy sweating an issue or a benefit for us?

All the afib commercials on tv are always active people bicycle riders, mountain climbers, golf etc.

Should we intake some mega dose of mag, pot, or other after a heavy sweat?? I know we def need to replenish water.

Thanks
Tim
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 08, 2018 01:18PM
I have a near infrared heat lamp sauna (4x250W heat lamps) in a 2.5'x4' shower that I insulated with Reflectix (thin, aluminum faced bubble wrap). It generally is only in the range of 104-110 deg F, however the near infrared will certainly heat the body. I usually sweat profusely for the 36 minutes I spend in it (on most days). Also almost all my workouts are in the full sun with only a thin swimsuit on - currently 95 deg F at solar noon, when I work out. I don't sweat very much on the workouts by comparison. I do take electrolytes, but no different on any day or the next and nothing is timed to my sweating. Also no different in the winter when I'm skiing at 15 deg F and not sweating.

I think this is something that you have to work out for yourself. Hydration and electrolytes are important. I don't use any commercial electrolyte drinks, I just consume magnesium as either acetate or di-magnesium malate powder, potassium citrate powder as well as iodized sea salt and a bit of sodium bicarbonate powder.

George
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 08, 2018 05:48PM
Quote
tsco
Should we intake some mega dose of mag, pot, or other after a heavy sweat?? I know we def need to replenish water.

Cyclist here. In my experience there's no better way to guarantee an afib episode than dehydration and the electrolyte imbalance that comes with it. I used to think I hydrated adequately but I discovered I was wrong. I literally doubled my water intake before, during and after long rides and added large doses of potassium with smaller amounts of salt and found that prevented the afib episodes I almost always experienced hours after a ride. I think most people vastly underestimate how much fluids and electrolytes they lose on hot days during prolonged exercise. If you wait until you're thirsty, it's far too late and you'll never catch up.
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 08, 2018 06:04PM
tsco - any activity that produces an abundance of sweating means a loss of all the electrolytes...and for afibbers, that can mean trouble and, of course, dehydration of tissue. The recommendations beyond adequate repletion of water include the electrolytes... magnesium, potassium, sodium and chloride. While sodium is often given bad marks and warnings, it's critical to help keep fluids in cells. Both Drs. Mark Sircus and David Brownstein have good reports on this topic at their websites.

Afibbers just need to be sure they maintain the magnesium and potassium stores and not just sodium or that can backfire.

There are many archived posts from afibbers reporting their problems with electrolyte loss and afib... along with how much staying on top of adequate hydration and electrolyte repletion during the activity helped eliminate the problem.

Also remember that prolonged dehydration can lead to thick blood and stroke risk, muscle pain and cramps... (your heart's a muscle.) Be smart.

[drsircus.com]

[www.celticseasaltblog.com]

Jackie
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 08, 2018 10:53PM
I have been working in my garden and really sweating, drips in my eyes and down my face. I havn't had an episode of AF for the last 5 weeks, I don't carry a water bottle with me, I go in and drink some water every so often but I don't drink the amounts that a lot of people on here say they do.

Liz
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 09, 2018 04:51AM
Profuse sweating is sign of Heart Failure. When I had Heart failure, I Sweat much more than usual, and I also had a harder time keeping warm in Cold Weather.
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 09, 2018 06:05AM
Awesome feedback,
Thanks everyone. I think this is perfect info for all of us. And totally with you Carey on the hydration. I am learning this summer it takes a huge amount of water more than I surely thought to maintain hydration.
Anti I'm sorry about your heart failure. I don't typically sweat, I was referring to putting a metal roof on a house on a 90 degree day or like Liz said working in a garden on a very hot day.
Thank you George and Jackie

Tim
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 09, 2018 10:38AM
Staying hydrated is hard and has always been an issue for me. The right balance of electrolyte on take has also been elusive.
In the early phases of my affib journey, pre first ablation, I had to be careful with sports drinks. Especially if they were mixes provided by event sponsors. The wrong mix could put me into affib. I got to the point where I only used liquimins in water with a splash of juice. Or if on a ride and stopping to refuel would mix 50/50 sports drink to water.
I currently use scratch labs products or if out on the run Body Armour Sports Drink.
Joe
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 09, 2018 08:50PM
I take it that you guys don't agree with him?
[www.amazon.com.au]
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 09, 2018 10:17PM
Quote
Joe
I take it that you guys don't agree with him?
[www.amazon.com.au]

Joe, I have a huge amount of respect for Dr. Noakes (who, off topic, just won the slam case against him on appeal!!! <[www.change.org] ).

I try not to over or under hydrate. My guide, if I have any question, is urine color. I want mine to have a bit of color, but certainly not dark or really clear. I put sodium bicarb, potassium citrate and magnesium chloride in water that has been run through a reverse osmosis filter (in measured quantities) to make sure I have minerals in my water.

Also, subsequent to keto-adapting nearly 9 years ago, My water requirement dropped dramatically. Though I don't do this as a matter of course, I can ski hard for 7.5 hours and not ever stop to drink, only having drunk a bit of water first thing in the morning. I can rock climb for 6 or so hours in the summer sun at 7,000' with little water (again, I don't push this as a matter of course). I drink a bit but it really isn't much needed for me. I can do all this and maintain decent urine color. I'm also doing the above fasted.

Part of my lower need for water is always breathing modestly through my nose. This reduces the amount of water vapor eliminated by breathing (as compared to breathing hard through the mouth).

George
Joe
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 10, 2018 03:34AM
Makes sense, George.
Thanks for the link! Pleased that Dr Noaks was found innocent of these stupid charges!

Incidentally, my drinking water is distilled with 1/16 teaspoon potassium carbonate + 1/16 tspsodium bicarb, tri-Mg Citrate 900mg and 1/16 tsp pink salt in 3.5 litre of water. Just mentioning it in case somebody can hopefully tell me if i'm on the wrong track.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/10/2018 03:53AM by Joe.
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 11, 2018 04:14PM
Pink salt? What is that? I only ask because meat curing salts (sodium nitrate, nitride) are often dyed pink and those are toxic and carcinogenic. I hope you're not drinking that!
Joe
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 11, 2018 04:48PM
No, no nitrate or nitride. It's just a salt with some other residual/trace minerals (supposedly) that's mined in some part of the world.
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 11, 2018 08:41PM
Quote
Joe
Incidentally, my drinking water is distilled with 1/16 teaspoon potassium carbonate + 1/16 tspsodium bicarb, tri-Mg Citrate 900mg and 1/16 tsp pink salt in 3.5 litre of water. Just mentioning it in case somebody can hopefully tell me if i'm on the wrong track.

Joe, I don't know what is optimal. I just made up water - in 4 gallons, which included 6 liters of 65 ppm deuterium depleted wate (DDW) and the rest RO (reverse osmosis) water, I put:

1 g MgCl2
2 g Sodium bicarb
10 g Potassium Citrate

The DDW has some remineralization in it, but I don't recall what. I've been fooling with this mixture, primarily by taste. My wife and I each drink about 1/2 gallon/day.

George
Joe
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 12, 2018 04:23AM
Thanks George!
Deuterium depleted water consumption is new for me. Just googled a bit - interesting!
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 13, 2018 09:32PM
Quote
Joe
Thanks George!
Deuterium depleted water consumption is new for me. Just googled a bit - interesting!

The DDW is an (expensive) experiment. I'm making 105 ppm water as I tested our source water and coming out of the RO filter. As the ultimate source of our water is snowmelt, the domestic water is relatively low (130 ppm - sea water is 155 ppm).. I have a family member with a glioblastoma, so am trying it out before they do. The idea is mitochondrial efficiency. In our case, as we are in pretty good health, I'm not expecting anything spectacular. Plan to reduce our body deuterium to around 120 ppm (from 142-143) and see what happens. The data on cancer are interesting, so that is the main purpose of the experiment. One researcher I know, after reducing his body deuterium to ~122, he quit consuming DDW and his body depleted itself to around 90 ppm. For healthy people, the suggestion is to get below 130 ppm. For cancer patients, the recommendation is much lower, but in steps. It is kind of like bacteria and an antibiotic. With each step, some cancer cells die, and then you want to reduce the level again and get another round of die off. One of the potential side effects is necrotic tumor tissue for someone with a large tumor load.

George
Re: Heat and Sweating
June 27, 2018 07:26AM
Dehydration caused my afib in the first place. So I do my best to stay hydrated.
Nancy
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