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Thanks for approving my account - new to afib

Posted by Ghost 
Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 21, 2017 01:19PM
Moderator, thank you for approving my account. I had stumbled upon this forum a little while ago to learn more about afib after having my second episode of it. The first episode was back in March of this year (17) when I woke up in the middle of the night. My 9 year old had crawled into bed and was kicking around and I decided to head to the spare bedroom to get some sleep. After lying back down again, my heart went crazy and it felt like a gorilla was inside trying to get out - that's the only way I could figure to explain it.

I'm a 46 year old male, no health issues and very athletic. Perfect blood pressure, no cholesterol issues - no health issues at all up to this point. After experiencing that crazy heart beat for an hour I felt like I was having a heart attack. I went to the ER and they admitted me for afib, something I had heard about in casual passing but didn't know much about.

They ran me through the gauntlet of tests, nuclear test, EKG, ultrasound, everything I can think of and found no issues. No defects, structural or otherwise, no anomalies, blood work perfectly fine, etc. They put me on Metoprolol, and about 10 hours or so later I converted over. Suddenly I have a cardiologist. She said at the time it might come back, it might not, but there were no physical reasons they could find that caused it. Gave me a bottle of Metoprolol tart in case it ever occurred again.

For about 2 months, every single tiny hiccup, every flutter, every beat while going to sleep at night - it was an anxiety nightmare. I waited for the next "failure" incident that could prove fatal. I was miserable. As time passed, I began to forget about it.

Fast forward to Dec 10th, this time 2PM middle of the afternoon, sitting at my computer in my home office reading some news, and zoom, there goes the heart - same exact thing. This time I took the Metoprolol on my own and lay down. I was so apprehensive the whole time (which didn't help, I'm sure) and around 9PM I felt like the only solution I had was to go back to the ER where the process repeated. I converted again the next day around noon. And again, the anxiety for the last two weeks is driving me insane, listening to every beat, waiting for something to go wrong. It's horrible. I get sick to my stomach, feel nauseous, etc.

Thanks for listening. It was somewhat therapeutic even to write this. I guess what I'm trying to understand most of all is "why". Is there a trigger I should be looking for? If I knew why I could work to eliminate or mitigate. But without knowing, I just feel helpless.

-Ghost
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 21, 2017 07:22PM
Hi Ghost,

Welcome to the forum. Sorry you needed to find it.

The first thing you need to know and remind yourself of frequently is that nobody dies of afib. Really. It might feel like it's going to kill you, but it won't. That simply does not happen.

Everyone wants to know what caused their afib but the reality is you'll probably never know. There are risk factors, but people with no risk factors at all get afib and people with all the risk factors don't. Most likely, it's genetic. There are two things that are known to contribute to afib you can check for. The first is sleep apnea and the second is hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism will be detected by standard blood tests given during a routine physical, but the sleep apnea requires a sleep study. You might want to ask your doctor about doing one.

Triggers are the next thing everyone searches for. Frankly, it's usually a futile search. You might find one or two things that consistently trigger your afib, but usually the things that people identify as triggers are in fact coincidental and didn't trigger it at all. Heavy drinking, and binge drinking in particular, are known to trigger afib (google "holiday heart"), so keep the alcohol in moderation. Dehydration, low potassium levels, and deranged electrolyte levels in general can also trigger it, so stay well hydrated and watch out for things that deplete electrolytes such as prolonged vomiting, diarrhea, and intense exercise without sufficient electrolyte replacement.

Ignore anyone who tells you to give up coffee even if they're a doctor. Caffeine does not trigger afib, and in fact there's some evidence that it's beneficial. Ditto with chocolate.

Is your cardiologist an electrophysiologist? If not, find one. EPs are cardiologists who specialize in the treatment of arrhythmias, and in my experience many non-EP cardiologists are sorely lacking in current knowledge of afib and its treatment. Don't agree to take digoxin or amiodarone, and aspirin is a dubious recommendation.

If your episodes continue, and I'm sorry to say they probably will, you need to consider an anticoagulant. The one thing afib can cause is strokes, so you may need an anticoagulant to protect you against that risk. You might also be eligible for what we call a "pill in pocket" (PIP) approach to dealing with your episodes. You're sort of doing that now with the metoprolol, but metoprolol only slows the rate down and makes you more comfortable. A PIP uses an antiarrhythmic drug such as flecainide to actually stop the episode. It works for some people but not all. Alternatively, you can take an antiarrhythmic drug daily to prevent episodes, but you may find the side effects unpleasant. These issues are things you need to discuss with your EP when you find him or her. I wouldn't advise taking them up with a non-EP cardiologist.

Finally, for your own sake quit going to the ER. You're not going to die and there's really nothing they can do for you. Your episode is going to end when it's ready and not one minute sooner (unless you get that PIP). Just relax as best you can, take the metoprolol, and wait it out.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/21/2017 07:26PM by Carey.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 21, 2017 10:46PM
Quote
Ghost
I'm a 46 year old male, no health issues and very athletic.
-Ghost

How athletic?

Chronic fitness is a known path to afib for some, including me. While exercise may be good for your heart plumbing, it may not (especially a lot of endurance cardio) be good for the electrical system.

<[www.afibbers.org]

Detraining was/is part of my successful strategy to keep afib in remission with a very low AF burden ( ~4 episodes totalling about 5 hours in 4 1/2 years). Another part of my strategy is magnesium to bowel tolerance.

Quote
Carey
Ignore anyone who tells you to give up coffee even if they're a doctor. Caffeine does not trigger afib, and in fact there's some evidence that it's beneficial. Ditto with chocolate.

I would note that some have posted that coffee was a trigger, and some of those found that organic coffee was not a trigger. I've been around long enough here (13 years) that my best advice is to pay attention to what happens to you, which may be different than what happens to others.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 12:42AM
Quote
GeorgeN
I would note that some have posted that coffee was a trigger,

Of course they have, but that doesn't mean it actually was. If I had a dollar for everything I've seen people claim was a trigger I'd be on a beach in the Caribbean right now.

Hey, he's new to afib. How about we agree to give him the broad strokes at this point and avoid the fine points of debate?
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 09:59AM
Ghost:

Your worrying too much about getting AFIB, or that are having AFIB. I suggest focusing more on what to do about it, if it comes. Iv'e had 45 or so Episodes, nothing real bad ever happened. You are right to look for "Triggers". Especially in your case, where they could not find anything else wrong. Keep a log or Diary. It won't hurt, and can only help. Obviously the more episodes someone has, the more likely they will find something that is Triggering their AFIB.

The Metropolol the Dr. gave you helps to slow down and control your HR. You may need to adjust this dosage or even add another type of drug, called a Calcium Channel Blocker to help control your HR, when you have an Episode. Controlling your HR, will lessen Symptoms.

I wouldn't worry about an Anti-Coagulant at this point, your Dr. will tell you if he thinks you need one. Most DR's will suggest AOC Drugs if it is a borderline call, for liability purposes. Everything you said points to Lone AFIB, so in that scenario, you should not need OAC, if you convert back within 48 hours, unless you episodes are frequent occurring more at least twice a month.

Finally if you are having extreme Anxiety during an Episode, especially at this early stage, it is OK to go to the ER. They can monitor your HR, and give you the proper levels of Metropolol or another Drug to help slow your HR down.
If you don't convert on your own, they give you other Drugs to help convert you, or perform an ECV (ElectroCardioVersion).

There are some people with AFIB, that when they have an Episode and it doesn't self-convert after awhile will go to the ER, and just get a ECV (Shock to the Heart) just to get the thing over and done with.

I agree with Carey that it is imperative that your get an EP specialist if you can. Once he/she is familiar with your case, then if you have an Episode and you need to go to the ER, the ER Dr. can call him to get instructed on what to do. This is very important if you go the ER route. ER rooms are very busy sometimes, and the skill level of the Dr's there can vary greatly. I have had some very bad experiences in the ER, either bad Staff or Dr. Having a well-known EP in your corner goes far to help you. And also if you choose to stay at home, the Cardiology Practice where the EP works, should have an on-call Dr. available to help guide your through the situation over the phone.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/22/2017 10:22AM by The Anti-Fib.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 10:04AM
Carey,

I cannot thank you enough for the reply. You seem to understand exactly what I am feeling, what the continuity of my quest for info is like, and how it is affecting me psychologically. That, in itself is a huge comfort. I'm so used to being "immortal" that when this occurred, it really hit me hard. Being the rock of the family, I wasn't able to let my guard down except for doing so here, with a pseudonym on an internet forum.

Am going for the full blood test, inclusive of thyroid check in the next few days. I've heard about the sleep apnea thing. Does sleep apnea contribute even though I had an afib episode in the middle of the day? Or is it causing potential damage to the heart that leads to afib regardless of time of day, etc? Just trying to understand better.

My cardiologist is an electrophysiologist, Dr. Juna Misiri here in Tampa. So I think I am in good hands.

I'm a big wine drinker and collector. I don't "binge drink" (thought admittedly my definition of that is more of what occurred in college) but I do have a couple of glasses of wine every so often (maybe once a week). I'm really hoping I don't have to give that up. I love my wine! sad smiley

My GP told me the same thing about the ER, stop being a sissy and don't go to the ER unless I can't get my heart rate down. I only went there because I panicked. Again, this is all a new thing for me.

Hope you have a happy holiday, and thank you again.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 10:06AM
Quote
GeorgeN
I'm a 46 year old male, no health issues and very athletic.
-Ghost

How athletic?

Chronic fitness is a known path to afib for some, including me. While exercise may be good for your heart plumbing, it may not (especially a lot of endurance cardio) be good for the electrical system.

<[www.afibbers.org]

Detraining was/is part of my successful strategy to keep afib in remission with a very low AF burden ( ~4 episodes totalling about 5 hours in 4 1/2 years). Another part of my strategy is magnesium to bowel tolerance.


Ignore anyone who tells you to give up coffee even if they're a doctor. Caffeine does not trigger afib, and in fact there's some evidence that it's beneficial. Ditto with chocolate.


I would note that some have posted that coffee was a trigger, and some of those found that organic coffee was not a trigger. I've been around long enough here (13 years) that my best advice is to pay attention to what happens to you, which may be different than what happens to others.

I work out in martial arts and jog a few times a week. I don't have the time to be obsessed about it. And I don't drink coffee, but sometimes I drink green tea.

Thanks for the comments!
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 10:07AM
Quote
Carey

I would note that some have posted that coffee was a trigger,

Of course they have, but that doesn't mean it actually was. If I had a dollar for everything I've seen people claim was a trigger I'd be on a beach in the Caribbean right now.

Hey, he's new to afib. How about we agree to give him the broad strokes at this point and avoid the fine points of debate?

Any wisdom you folks can share is greatly appreciated.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 10:08AM
Same here. I was 41y old when mine started. At the time running 6-7 miles, 6 days/week with one "off" day. My BMI at the time was probably 20, BP normal, no tobacco, no diabetes. Normal echo, no heart defects or valve problems.

More than likely it's just the increased vagal tone that slows your resting heart rate down so much that the normal pacemaker -the sino-atrial node - has to compete with other ectopic pacemakers probably in and around the pulmonary veins. You just have to hit on that "perfect storm" of conditions where the SA node narrowly matches the phase and frequency of the errant signals, and - BAM - a ping pong game ensues in your atria. It stops when it stops and you'll feel beat up when it does. No fun at all.

I second the recommendations on an EP consult. As we say, don't just go with convenience here. Find the best, most experienced left-atrial ablationist you can, even if it means travel. I tend to think any one you find will probably be happy to treat you, because - if you'll permit a bit of cynicism here - guys like us pad their success rates. We're easy cases.

Good luck and welcome to the club no one wants to join!
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 10:14AM
Quote
The Anti-Fib
Ghost:

Your worrying too much about getting AFIB, or that are having AFIB. I suggest focusing more on what to do about it, if it comes. Iv'e had 45 or so Episodes, nothing real bad ever happened. You are right to look for "Triggers". Especially in your case, where they could not find anything else wrong. Keep a log or Diary. It won't hurt, and can only help. Obviously the more episodes someone has, the more likely they will find something that is Triggering their AFIB.

The Metropolol the Dr. gave you helps to slow down and control your HR. You may need to adjust this dosage or even add another type of drug, called a Calcium Channel Blocker to help control your HR, when you have an Episode. Controlling your HR, will lessen Symptoms.

I wouldn't worry about an Anti-Coagulant at this point, your Dr. will tell you if he thinks you need one. Most DR's will suggest AOC Drugs if it is a borderline call, for liability purposes. Everything you said points to Lone AFIB, so in that scenario, you should not need OAC, if you convert back within 48 hours, unless you episodes are frequent occurring more at least twice a month.

Thank you, Anti-fib. I appreciate your commentary. Have a happy holiday.
Finally if you are having extreme Anxiety during an Episode, especially at this early stage, it is OK to go to the ER. They can monitor your HR, and give you the proper levels of Metropolol or another Drug to help slow your HR down.
If you don't convert on your own, they give you other Drugs to help convert you, or perform an ECV (ElectroCardioVersion).

There are some people with AFIB, that when they have an Episode and it doesn't self-convert after awhile will go to the ER, and just get a ECV (Shock to the Heart) just to get the thing over and done with.

I agree with Carey that it is imperative that your get an EP specialist if you can. Once he/she is familiar with your case, then if you have an Episode and you need to go to the ER, the ER Dr. can call him to get instructed on what to do. This is very important if you go the ER route. ER rooms are very busy sometimes, and the skill level of the Dr's there can vary greatly. And also if you choose to stay at home, the Cardiology Practice where the EP works, should have an on-call Dr. available to help guide your through the situation over the phone.

You are correct, I am worrying too much. Doing my best to combat that - I meditate once a week but have had a hard time getting into "mindlessness" lately. Working on it!

The ER isn't the best solution simply because of the cost. It's fine now that I've hit my deductible but not sustainable. Sounds like I need to man up and just focus on the one simple fact: Afib won't kill me, and to respect it and deal with it correctly if and when it occurs.

Right now I'm taking an aspirin 350mg daily, and the doc says that's good to go. She said if I experience a major anxiety attack, take a Metropolol and relax.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 10:15AM
Quote
wolfpack
Same here. I was 41y old when mine started. At the time running 6-7 miles, 6 days/week with one "off" day. My BMI at the time was probably 20, BP normal, no tobacco, no diabetes. Normal echo, no heart defects or valve problems.

More than likely it's just the increased vagal tone that slows your resting heart rate down so much that the normal pacemaker -the sino-atrial node - has to compete with other ectopic pacemakers probably in and around the pulmonary veins. You just have to hit on that "perfect storm" of conditions where the SA node narrowly matches the phase and frequency of the errant signals, and - BAM - a ping pong game ensues in your atria. It stops when it stops and you'll feel beat up when it does. No fun at all.

I second the recommendations on an EP consult. As we say, don't just go with convenience here. Find the best, most experienced left-atrial ablationist you can, even if it means travel. I tend to think any one you find will probably be happy to treat you, because - if you'll permit a bit of cynicism here - guys like us pad their success rates. We're easy cases.

Good luck and welcome to the club no one wants to join!

Thanks, Wolf. Are you saying you believe I should consider ablation? MY GP suggested that but I thought it might be a bit premature to go down that route. Did you do it? I don't see the EP until after the holidays.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/22/2017 10:16AM by Ghost.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 10:26AM
Quote
Ghost

Thanks, Wolf. Are you saying you believe I should consider ablation? MY GP suggested that but I thought it might be a bit premature to go down that route. Did you do it? I don't see the EP until after the holidays.

I had the ablation about 6 months after AF started.

In my opinion, ablation should be a first line treatment option in our cases. Objectively speaking, we're young, fit, and unlikely to experience complications in the hands of an experienced and competent EP. Why wait 4 or 5 years for the episodes to increase in frequency and burden? And that aspirin is going make your stomach bleed. Also the metoprolol -if you are in fact a vagally mediated a fibber - is going to make things worse by turning nighttime episodes into midday ones as well. Maybe not, but it stands a good chance of doing just that.

In the end it's a personal decision, of course. I tend toward the aggressive myself, so that's the route I went. I'm 43 now, AF free and pretty much back to "torturing" my heart with endurance cardio and beer ( not at the same time mind you smiling smiley)

Relax and enjoy the holiday. I really think you'll be fine.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/22/2017 10:29AM by wolfpack.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 10:47AM
Quote
wolfpack


Thanks, Wolf. Are you saying you believe I should consider ablation? MY GP suggested that but I thought it might be a bit premature to go down that route. Did you do it? I don't see the EP until after the holidays.

I had the ablation about 6 months after AF started.

In my opinion, ablation should be a first line treatment option in our cases. Objectively speaking, we're young, fit, and unlikely to experience complications in the hands of an experienced and competent EP. Why wait 4 or 5 years for the episodes to increase in frequency and burden? And that aspirin is going make your stomach bleed. Also the metoprolol -if you are in fact a vagally mediated a fibber - is going to make things worse by turning nighttime episodes into midday ones as well. Maybe not, but it stands a good chance of doing just that.

In the end it's a personal decision, of course. I tend toward the aggressive myself, so that's the route I went. I'm 43 now, AF free and pretty much back to "torturing" my heart with endurance cardio and beer ( not at the same time mind you smiling smiley)

Relax and enjoy the holiday. I really think you'll be fine.

Ok, well, I will certainly ask the EP what she thinks is the way to go. Your argument is logical. One treatment was good enough for you? Easy recovery time?
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 11:31AM
Quote
Ghost

Ok, well, I will certainly ask the EP what she thinks is the way to go. Your argument is logical. One treatment was good enough for you? Easy recovery time?
:
So far, so good. Time will tell if I'm a "one-and-done" case or not.

The hardest thing about recovery is reminding yourself that you need to recover. I actually hopped on a treadmill 8 days after the ablation (don't do that) and managed to re-invoke AF for a few minutes. Then I learned enough to keep myself "idle" for about the next 4 weeks before really resuming activity. So, no, it's not bad at all. You'll just need to find a new hobby for a month to keep yourself distracted.

I will say that I battled ectopics (PACs) for a year afterwards, but following the advice found here on this forum with regards to supplementation - especially magnesium in the bio-available forms - helped tremendously with that to the point now that PACs are single-digit occurrences per day if any at all.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 02:40PM
Given your age, an ablation makes a lot of sense. Managing afib with drugs is quite often less than 100% successful, and all the drugs involved have side effects that anyone who's physically active isn't going to like much. Also, most of the antiarrhythmics tend to stop working after a variable period of time (years, unpredictable how many), and some can even become pro-arrhythmic.

However, if I were you I would wait a few months in order to get an idea how much afib burden you actually have. Two episodes in a 9-month period isn't much at all. From 2002 until 2008 I experienced one or two episodes per year, with each one lasting about 6 hours. I did nothing about it because I didn't feel it was worth doing anything about. It was just an annoyance. Only in 2008 when the frequency and duration started increasing did I seek treatment. I'm not recommending that you do that, but it is an option if your burden remains low.

If you do pursue an ablation, find the absolute best EP you can. "Best" is measured mainly by the number of procedures they've done, and what you want to see is thousands, not hundreds, and certainly not dozens. Even if have to travel to find the best there is, it's worth the time and money to do so. Trust me on this.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 05:03PM
Quote
Carey
Given your age, an ablation makes a lot of sense. Managing afib with drugs is quite often less than 100% successful, and all the drugs involved have side effects that anyone who's physically active isn't going to like much. Also, most of the antiarrhythmics tend to stop working after a variable period of time (years, unpredictable how many), and some can even become pro-arrhythmic.

However, if I were you I would wait a few months in order to get an idea how much afib burden you actually have. Two episodes in a 9-month period isn't much at all. From 2002 until 2008 I experienced one or two episodes per year, with each one lasting about 6 hours. I did nothing about it because I didn't feel it was worth doing anything about. It was just an annoyance. Only in 2008 when the frequency and duration started increasing did I seek treatment. I'm not recommending that you do that, but it is an option if your burden remains low.

If you do pursue an ablation, find the absolute best EP you can. "Best" is measured mainly by the number of procedures they've done, and what you want to see is thousands, not hundreds, and certainly not dozens. Even if have to travel to find the best there is, it's worth the time and money to do so. Trust me on this.

Good advice. Is there an EP anyone here can recommend as a starting point for research?
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 07:29PM
Quote
Ghost
Good advice. Is there an EP anyone here can recommend as a starting point for research?

Andrea Natale at the Texas Cardiac Arrhythmia Institute in Austin, TX. That's starting your research at the top.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 22, 2017 07:49PM
Quote
Carey
If you do pursue an ablation, find the absolute best EP you can. "Best" is measured mainly by the number of procedures they've done, and what you want to see is thousands, not hundreds, and certainly not dozens. Even if have to travel to find the best there is, it's worth the time and money to do so. Trust me on this.

To expound further on that statement, you want to ask “how many complex, left-atrial ablations” have you done? The relatively easy, right-sided flutter procedures don’t count.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 23, 2017 11:10AM
I was hit out of the blue at 40 with mine. Knowing what I know today, I would have not wasted one year on drugs and gone straight for an ablation. I'd like to think I would have got on a plane and gone straight to Dr. Natale but who thinks they need to go see the best in the world, especially if you are near a major medical center. So I would likely have stayed local.

But now, as I sit here afib free a bit over three months from my 4th ablation, 1st with Natale, I can say after the first failed local ablation I would have gone straight to Natale. I would likely have actually enjoyed the last two years of my life afib free instead of depressed and wondering where life was going.

Sorry, but your afib is likley to come back, only you can decide how much is too much for you, but it's never "too early" to see the best guy and get an ablation.

This sucks and will be some of the hardest soul searching and choices you may have had to make thus far, so don't beat yourself up over that. No one wants this, it sucks way more than most doctors understand and can literally take life away. No one who does not have it will look at you and understand. That's OK, how coudl they. But you don't have to let it take over, give yourself the best possible chance you can at beating this!
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 23, 2017 03:36PM
Much appreciated.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 25, 2017 08:59AM
Coffee is definitely a trigger for my AF. MINE IS VAGAL.
Alcohol is another one as is eating too fast.
I can wake up with it, or laugh to hard, or sneeze, or drink something too cold and I’ll get an episode.
Modern thinking tells us AF can be dangerous...you cannot have a heart rate of 190+ day in day out without it eventually causing problems.
Also strokes in people wth AF CAN BE DEVASTING...so you need to read all you can and tailor the treatment to yourself.
There are long standing and knowledgeable members on this site that will give you valuable information to assist you but you are the master of your destiny.
Anxiety is common but you will,by learning about your condition and finding a regime that helps, find you are able to accept it more easily.
Knowledge is your weapon. Read read read. It definitely helps. My episodes run in the 100’s so learning to deal with my anxiety and fear was sanity saving. 😳😳



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/25/2017 09:08AM by JoyWin.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 25, 2017 02:05PM
Agreed, everyone is different but AFIB was essentially killing me, at my worst my ejection fraction was at 25%.
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
December 26, 2017 11:58AM
Hello Ghost… I wasn’t available to respond initially to your intro post and note that you have received many ideas and considerations for what might underlie your onset of arrhythmia. I’m responding now with a few suggestions that may help to lessen or even reverse your arrhythmia trend. The best assessments start with common, daily habits or self-risk management assessment.

The importance of recognizing a potential for magnesium deficiency and arrhythmia can’t be emphasized enough- It’s known that over 80% of afibbers are found to be magnesium deficient. The magnesium content in food is not high so even a concentrated effort to eat lots of magnesium containing foods, such as raw almonds, may not help replenish what your body requires continually. Typically, supplementation is needed and ideally, an accurate test for intracellular magnesium should be done… such as the RBC magnesium or ExaTest Intracellular testing.

Many causes for magnesium deficiency. Alcohol is high on the list -- as is stress -- of all types…so this would include a heavy exercise regimen. Rx drugs and other chemicals also rapidly deplete magnesium and a diet high in calcium-containing foods such as dairy ie, cheese, yogurt serve to block the action of magnesium inside cells … and in heart cells, this is especially critical. Alcohol kills heart muscle cells.

You mention sleep apnea and that does have potential for being causative so if you are able to do at least an initial home study evaluation, that will help rule out that influence.

Dehydration from all sources helps reduce the balance of the critical minerals or electrolytes …specifically those that function in maintaining normal heart rhythm…. Ie, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride, calcium. Those who are highly athletic need to be aware of adequate, pure water intake and also replenishing all of the core electrolytes regularly.

Certain dietary choices which would include energy drinks can be potentially risky when it comes to arrhythmia and if you use energy drinks, then you need to scrutinize labels for various additives that can be triggers.

Some afibbers find that if they become hypoglycemic from over-exercise, poor food choices such as high carb/sugar foods, low fat and low protein intake, they will have a low blood sugar (glucose) response that is a trigger for afib. That’s one of the easier causes to correct.

Various causes of afib can be highly individualized. One afibber cured hers by eliminating H.pylori infection. Another, tested positive for gluten sensitivity and eliminating all sources of gluten, cured his afib. Another was sensitive to excitotoxic free glutamates that are liberated with long cooking of meat… by cooking in a different manner, eliminated her afib. Quite often, and especially today, there are many chemical exposures that trigger arrhythmia. It’s typically highly individualized. We know a lot of foods are heavily sprayed with chemicals while growing and during harvesting… these residuals can cause a variety of reactions and for some, it’s arrhythmia. Imported foods are (by law) sprayed at the border with pesticides even if organic. Some find that the constant exposure to Electromagnetic Frequencies cause heart arrhythmia and while it’s ‘painful’ to consider limiting exposure time, it may be a highly significant consideration to eliminate what you can and protect against. There is science to support the damage EMFs can do.

You can also check Conference Room 24 on Cardiac Fibrosis [www.afibbers.org]

While it’s time consuming, it’s really important to assess all potential influences of anything that might be toxic to your particular biochemistry. Leave no stone unturned. No point rushing into an ablation if you haven’t made changes in the potential life-style risk factors.

Glad to help you with your assessment or supplementation recommendations. Send me a PM.


Be well,
Jackie
Re: Thanks for approving my account - new to afib
January 02, 2018 01:25PM
Sent. Thank you, Jackie.
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